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How to make the best Aeropress Coffee

Table of Contents

Someone squeezing Aeropress Coffee into a jug, on the top of Bean Merchant's how to make Aeropress Coffee website

Aeropress is one of the most recent additions to the coffee-brewing world and is also one of the most portable, and flavour-packed ways of enjoying coffee. This post will run you through exactly how to brew a cup of coffee with your Aeropress.

Why is Aeropress Coffee so good?

There are a few benefits to Aeropress coffee, the fact that it is so incredibly portable, you can take it just about anywhere. The amount of flavours that emerge in a coffee brewed through an Aeropress are astounding, allowing you to really taste the type of coffee bean you have without any of the traditional bitterness of other brew methods. The Aeropress will allow you to brew cups of coffee while maintaining what those in the business call body and clarity. Allowing you to really savour the flavours in your mouth, and for them to linger on your tongue for a long time. . Sometimes pour-overs tend to be too easy, however, Aeropress brings out greater frame at the same time as it maintains the cup from being over-the-top muddy. Makes a pleasant sturdy cup with greater taste readability than a French Press.

Is the Aeropress identical to the French Press?

The Aeropress and French press are similar in name alone. Some of the differences between them are brewing time, coffee sludge, ease of cleaning.

Coffee Brewing Time with an Aeropress versus a French Press

Brewing time with the Aeropress is much shorter than the French Press. Sometime the Aeropress coffee brew time can be as low as 1 minute 30 seconds, whereas you’re looking at around four minutes for a good cup of French Press (plunger). At the end of the day, the difference in coffee brewing time is only a few minutes, but that can save you a few minutes of your precious morning routine.

Coffee Sludge with an Aeropress versus a French Press

Both the Aeropress and the French Press (plunger) filter their coffee through a coffee filter. The difference is that the Aeropress filters in a much better way than the French Press ever could. The tight weave of the filters for the Aeropress as the coffee is forced through it stops 99% of the coffee grinds getting through, however as you push the plunger of the French Press through your coffee, small fine grinds of coffee sludge invariably make their way into your cup, and sit at the bottom when you’re finished. If you’re not keen on coffee sludge at the bottom of your cup, the Aeropress is a much better purchase to make.

Ease of cleaning with an Aeropress vs a French Press

Both the Aeropress and the French press pull apart, and it is relatively easy to clean all the different bits. The difference between them is the filter. In the Aeropress, you generally use disposable filters, and throw out the filter once you are finished with it. With the French Press (plunger) you clean the mesh each time. Generally the filter of the French Press is difficult to clean, and you are left with coffee residue, small grinds, or oils on it, especially if you just give it a quick rinse. All taken into account, the Aeropress is easier to clean than the French Press, though only just, and it’s a different story if you decide to use reusable Aeropress filters.

Is an Aeropress worth it?

The major benefits of the Aeropress (apart from those mentioned above) are the quantity of coffee you can brew, and the ease of transportation. Because Aeropress is small, it only makes small, concentrated amounts of coffee. You can get away with brewing three concentrated cups of Aeropress coffee relatively quickly, and even brew coffee for one quite easily. It’s lightweight, and easy to carry around. If you’re going camping for example, you can easily add it to your pack, and you don’t need to be worried about any glass bits smashing or it taking up an unfair amount of room.

Is Aeropress more potent than Espresso?

Both the Aeropress and the Espresso machine use pressure to force water through coffee grounds. The espresso machine uses a portafilter to make sure no coffee grinds enter the cup, whereas the Aeropress uses a paper filter. Espresso Machines usually try to get up to about 9 bars of pressure, which is equivalent to 130 PSI, over4 times the pressure of a regular car tyre. You’re never going to get anywhere near that amount of pressure from your Aeropress, unless you’re herculean. Therefore the coffee that comes out of an espresso machine is more potent than that of the Aeropress. You also get more crema, and more chance of varied tastes. The Aeropress, because of it’s relatively low pressure avoids much of the bitterness of espresso brewing, and still allows a lot of the flavours to enter the cup.

How important are fresh beans for AeroPress Coffee​

The most important part of any brewing method is beans that are fresh from the roaster. The longer they age after roasting, the more CO2 they let out, and the less flavourful they become. Those supermarket coffee beans you’re drinking right now. Yeah, they’re around 3 months old when they get to the supermarket shelf. The beauty of the Aeropress is the amount of flavours it brings out of ground coffee, and the best way to get those flavours is from freshly roasted coffee beans.

Order some beans from us and we’ll deliver them to you fresh from the roaster before they reach their peak flavours at 2 weeks. Try our quiz, and we’ll even match the beans we’re sending to what you enjoy about coffee. With such a huge range of roasters, we’ve got something for everyone – you can’t go wrong.

Right, back to how to make the best AeroPress coffee.

The AeroPress coffee recipe​

Ratio, grind size, and brewing time are some of your variables here. You can control how strong you want your coffee by modifying each of them. The recommended dosage for an AeroPress varies from around 75g per litre to 100g per litre. There are many different methods for AeroPress there is an AeroPress world championship that people compete in with different AeroPress recipes. This recipe is the basic one that traditionally comes with the AeroPress. You might like to do some searching and explore your own, or even invent one and enter the championship yourself!

How to make the best Aeropress Coffee

Step 1

Add a paper filter to the filter holder and lock the AeroPress together.

Step 2

Run some hot water through the AeroPress to warm the device and saturate the paper.

Step 3

Measure and add the desired amount of coffee depending on your recipe.

Step 4

Add hot water to the AeroPress and give the coffee a brief stir.

Step 5

Add the piston to the top of the AeroPress.

Step 6

Push the piston down, until the coffee is expelled from the AeroPress.

Enjoy.

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